Languages

Spanish Courses

Spanish 2
Spanish 3
Spanish 4
AP Spanish Language
AP Spanish Literature

French Courses

French 2
French 3
French 4
AP French Language and Culture

Latin Courses

Latin 2
Latin 3
Latin 4
AP Latin: Vergil

Other Languages

Spanish II: (five credit hours per week)
The class will focus on developing all four areas of modern language apprehension: speaking, writing, reading and listening. Vocabulary topics could include, but are not limited to, physical descriptions, emotions, nature, shopping, culture, travel and transportation. Grammar units covered will include a review of basic tenses (present, preterite and imperfect), as well as an introduction to the conditional and future tenses, commands, and the subjunctive mood. Other topics covered will be the use of negatives, “por” vs. “para”, reflexive verb construction, and prepositions of location. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

Spanish III: (five credit hours per week)
The class will focus on developing all four areas of modern language apprehension: speaking, writing, reading and listening. Vocabulary topics could include, but are not limited to, conflicts and resolution, the arts, relationships, and the media. The grammatical aspects of the class will focus on an amplification of the subjunctive mood and its uses, commands, an introduction to the perfect tenses, as well as various uses of the pronoun “se”. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

Spanish IV: (five credit hours per week)
This class will focus on developing the four areas of foreign language apprehension – speaking, reading, writing and listening – by using the textbook along with other sources such as literature, music and periodicals. Vocabulary themes could include – but are not limited to – health, travel and transportation, hotels, the home, and professions. Grammar units covered will concentrate on a review of the future and conditional tenses, an amplification of various perfect tenses as well as the subjunctive mood and its uses, and an introduction to the imperfect subjunctive, including “si” clauses. The class will also be reading several short stories from both Latin American and Spanish authors. The cultural aspect of the course will focus on Jews within the Latin culture. The students’ experiences in Israel will be used as both a conversational and writing focal point. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

AP Spanish Language
An AP Spanish Language course is comparable to an advanced level (5th- and 6th-semester or the equivalent) college Spanish language course. Emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students: understand Spanish spoken by native speakers at a natural pace, with a variety of regional pronunciations, in both informal (interpersonal) and formal (presentational) contexts; develop an active vocabulary sufficient for reading newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary literature, and other non-technical writings (websites, letters and emails, advertisements, signs and instructions) in Spanish without dependence on a dictionary; express themselves by describing, narrating, inquiring, and developing arguments in Spanish, both orally and in writing, with reasonable fluency, using different strategies for different audiences and communicative contexts. In this course, special emphasis is placed on the use of authentic source materials and the integration of language skills.

AP Spanish Literature (five credit hours per week):
An AP Spanish Literature course is comparable to a third-year college introduction to Hispanic literature course. It is based on a required reading list (students must bring a list of the works they have already completed studying). The works on the list are of literary significance and represent various historical periods, literary movements, genres, geographic areas, and population groups within the Spanish-speaking world. The objective of the course is to help you interpret and analyze literature in Spanish.

French II: (five credit hours per week)
The following grammatical topics will be covered: third group verbs; complements, pronouns and their place in the sentence; degrees of comparison; adjectives and adverbs; imperative and “passe compose” of pronominal verbs; past tenses passe compose and imperfect; future of regular and irregular verbs. Writing skills are included in the grammar and vocabulary development units. Vocabulary topics used to develop oral and written skills include: meeting a French family, in the subway, cooking, holidays, at the airport, transportation, holidays, food, at the restaurant, etc. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent , Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

French III: (five credit hours per week)
The following grammar topics will be covered: pronouns (complement, demonstrative, and relative); qui, que, dont, ou, lequel; third group verbs; conditional present and past; indirect speech; subjunctive (present and past). Vocabulary topics used to develop oral and written skills include: knowing other French speaking countries: Africa, Canada, Haiti; vacationing; leisure time; history of literature and French civilization. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent , Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Students may be asked to prepare oral reports in French about their Israel experience. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

French IV: (five credit hours per week)
The fourth year of French further develops the students’ ability to read original selections from many genres of French literature. Attention is also given to increasing fluency in the language. The students complete their study of the major grammatical structures and verb tenses as well as review those previously learned. The course is conducted in French. The teacher will select the literary material to be studied. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent, Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Students may be asked to prepare oral reports in French about their Israel experience. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

AP French Language and Culture
The AP French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable you to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication skills. Students will develop understanding and appreciation of the cultures of the French -speaking world including: Cultural Products such as television and film, books, newspapers, music, laws, and institutions; Cultural Practices such as customs, traditions, and patterns of interactions; Cultural Perspectives such as values, attitudes, and beliefs. Students will also study a variety of topics in engaging themes such as: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics.

Latin 2: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level two, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

Latin 3: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level three, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

Latin 4: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level four, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

AP Latin: Vergil: (five credit hours per week)
The course covers the following sections of the Aeneid: Book 1: lines 1-519, Book 2: lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, and 735-804, Book 4: lines 1-448, 642-705, Book 6: lines 1-211, 450-476, and 847-901, Book 10: lines 420-509, Book 12: lines 791-842, 887-952. Students should bring a copy of the Aeneid, as well as an accurate list of the sections they have already studied prior to arrival. Familiarity with the entire content of Books 1 through 12 will also be tested. Students are tested on their abilities in the following areas: To write a literal English translation of a Latin passage on the syllabus, To explicate specific words or phrases in context, To identify the context and significance of short excerpts from texts listed in the chosen syllabus, To identify and analyze characteristic or noteworthy features of the authors’ modes of expression, including their use of imagery, figures of speech, sound effects, and metrical effects (in poetry only), as seen in specific passages, To discuss particular motifs or general themes not only suggested by passages but also relevant to other selections, To analyze and discuss structure and to demonstrate an awareness of the features used in the construction of a poem or an argument, To scan the meters specified in the syllabus.

Other languages: (five credit hours per week)
In recent years, students have taken the following languages as private or semi-private tutorials: Japanese, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, German, American Sign Language, and Russian. Please contact the Ramah Jerusalem High School office for more information. Students will need to bring appropriate curricula and a textbook.