General Studies Courses

Please download our TRY Course Descriptions for a more detailed description of the courses that we offer.

English Department

English Language and World Literature
AP English Literature and Composition
AP English Language and Composition

History Department

US History
AP US History
World History / Global History
AP World History
US Government
AP US Government
AP Comparative Government
Economics
AP Macroeconomics
AP Microeconomics
AP European History
Canadian History
AP Psychology
Sociology

English Language and World Literature (five credit hours per week):
Students will read a selection of novels, short stories, and poems (in translation) by Israeli and Jewish authors throughout the semester. Essays will enable students to hone their skills in narrative, expository, and argumentative writing. Students will learn to recognize rhetorical and literary elements, such as allegory, metaphor, foreshadowing, and allusion. Honors credit may be earned.

AP English Literature and Composition (five credit hours per week)
The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students should consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

AP English Language and Composition (five credit hours per week):
The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.

US History (five credit hours per week)
This course covers the period from the 19th Century (Progressive Era) to the present, emphasizing such topics as: the rise of industrialism and military power, World War I, post-war isolation, economic boom and the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, Watergate, the Reagan years, the fall of Communism, and the US as a World Power. Honors credit may be earned. This course fulfills Regents requirements for NY State. Subject to sufficient demand we may open a course that covers the second quarter of the US History curriculum(post-Colonial through Reconstruction) for students whose schools operate on a two-year US History cycle.

AP US History (five credit hours per week):
The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and enduring understandings necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format.

World History / Global History (five credit hours per week):
This course covers such topics as: European unification and nationalism, socialism, Western imperialism, World War I, the rise of Communism, the rise of dictatorships, World War II, the Cold War, and today’s changing world. Honors credit may be earned.

AP World History (five credit hours per week):
The AP World History course begins towards the middle of Period 4, Global Interactions c. 1450-1750, and then move into Period 5, Industrialization ad Global Integration c. 1750 to 1900, and finally Period 6, Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, c. 1900 to the present. The course will develop the four historical thinking skills defined by the College Board (crafting historical arguments from historical evidence, chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, and historical interpretation and synthesis). Additionally, the course will cover each of the College Board’s defined themes as applicable to each historical period and geographic area (interaction between humans and the environment, development and interaction of cultures, state-building, expansion, and conflict, creation, expansion and interaction of economic systems, and development and transformation of social structures.)

US Government (five credit hours per week):
This course introduces the student to the study of US national, state and local government, provides the basic concepts of our government and explores areas of political interests to all citizens. The course includes consideration of the political process and democratic ideology, such as equality, liberty and justice and stresses the process by which political decisions are made. The course also examines how decisions that are made at the national and state levels impact the local level and, conversely, how local issues affect state and national policy. The differences between liberal and conservative political thought are also examined. Honors credit may be earned.

AP US Government (five credit hours per week):
The AP Government & Politics: United States course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality.

AP Comparative Government (five credit hours per week):
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.
Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course. China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia are all regularly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses. The inclusion of Iran adds a political system from a very important region of the world and one that is subject to distinctive political and cultural dynamics.

Economics (five credit hours per week):
The first half of the course introduces the basic principles of economics as a social science: topics such as scarcity, supply and demand and bureaucratic organization make up this microeconomic section of the course. The second half of the course examines topics related to the total economy, macroeconomics. Economic performance, taxes, banking, inflation, unemployment and trade are emphasized.  Honors credit may be earned.

AP Macroeconomics (five credit hours per week):
An AP course in Macroeconomics is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. Students must bring their own textbooks.

AP Microeconomics (five credit hours per week):
The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to provide a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students must bring their own textbooks.

AP European History (five credit hours per week):
The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of the AP program in European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Students must bring their own textbooks.

Canadian History (five credit hours per week):
This course explores the local, national, and global forces that have shaped Canada’s national identity from World War I to the present. Students will investigate the challenges presented by economic, social, and technological changes and explore the contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian culture and society during this period. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to evaluate various interpretations of the issues and events of the period and to present their own points of view. This course can be offered as Academic or Applied.

AP Psychology (five credit hours per week):
The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Sociology (five credit hours per week):
This course is designed to investigate the principles of sociology, the individual in group, social institutions, social control, and the use of research methods to examine social problems. The course provides practice to students in developing critical thinking, decision-making, and social studies skills concerning human relationships.

TRY offers additional make-up classes for students who have not yet covered the preceding periods or material in their home schools by the beginning of the program. The cost of these make-up classes will vary depending on how much material needs to be covered.

Geometry
Algebra II
Algebra II – Trigonometry in Spring semester
Algebra II – No Trigonometry in Spring semester
Pre-Calculus
Pre-Calculus – Trigonometry in Spring semester
Pre-Calculus – No Trigonometry in Spring semester
Calculus and AP Calculus AB/BC
AP Statistics

Geometry (five credit hours per week)
The topics covered in the spring semester are: Quadrilaterals, Similarity, Right Triangle Trigonometry – tangent, sine and cosine with applications, Circles, Area, surface area and volume. Some attention will be given to proofs if required.

Algebra II / Trigonometry (five credit hours per week)
At least two sections of the course are offered:

Algebra II with Trigonometry
This course covers the following topics in the spring semester: Triangle trigonometry, all functions of acute and general angles, right triangles, law of sines and cosines, area of triangles; Trigonometric graphs and identities – radian measure, circular functions, graphs of sine, cosine, tangent, fundamental identities, addition formulas; half angle and double angle formula; Exponents, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; Statistics and probability; Sequences and series.

Algebra II without Trigonometry (five credit hours per week):
This course covers the following topics in the spring semester: Quadratic equations and functions; Polynomial equations, division of polynomials, synthetic, remainder and factor theorem, methods of solving polynomial equations; Analytic geometry, conic sections, solving systems of equations; Exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; Sequences and series, binomial expansions.

Pre-Calculus (five credit hours per week)
At least two sections of the course are offered:

Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry (five credit hours per week):
This course covers the following topics in the spring semester: Trigonometric functions; Trigonometric identities and equations; Triangle trigonometry; trigonometric addition formulas; Polar coordinates and complex numbers; Introduction to calculus – graphs of rational functions, limits, slope of a curve, understanding and finding basic derivatives and some applications.
Pre-Calculus without Trigonometry (five credit hours per week):
This course covers the following topics in the spring semester: Polar coordinates and complex numbers; Vectors and determinants; Sequences and series; Statistics and probability; Introduction to calculus – graphs of rational functions, limits, slope of a curve, understanding and finding basic derivatives and some applications; Note – other topics can be added depending upon the needs of the students.

Calculus and AP Calculus AB/BC (five credit hours per week):
Major topics covered in this second semester Calculus course include: The Integral; Applications of the Integral; Exponential, Logarithmic and Inverse Trigonometric Functions; Methods of Integration; Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates. AB Calculus topics include: Functions, Graphs, and Limits, Derivatives, and Integrals. BC Calculus students also cover Polynomial Approximations and Series.

AP Statistics (five credit hours per week):
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns, Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study, Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

Spanish Courses

Spanish 2
Spanish 3
Spanish 4
AP Spanish Language
AP Spanish Literature

French Courses

French 2
French 3
French 4
AP French Language and Culture

Latin Courses

Latin 2
Latin 3
Latin 4
AP Latin: Vergil

Other Languages

 

Spanish II: (five credit hours per week)
The class will focus on developing all four areas of modern language apprehension: speaking, writing, reading and listening. Vocabulary topics could include, but are not limited to, physical descriptions, emotions, nature, shopping, culture, travel and transportation. Grammar units covered will include a review of basic tenses (present, preterite and imperfect), as well as an introduction to the conditional and future tenses, commands, and the subjunctive mood. Other topics covered will be the use of negatives, “por” vs. “para”, reflexive verb construction, and prepositions of location. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

Spanish III: (five credit hours per week)
The class will focus on developing all four areas of modern language apprehension: speaking, writing, reading and listening. Vocabulary topics could include, but are not limited to, conflicts and resolution, the arts, relationships, and the media. The grammatical aspects of the class will focus on an amplification of the subjunctive mood and its uses, commands, an introduction to the perfect tenses, as well as various uses of the pronoun “se”. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

Spanish IV: (five credit hours per week)
This class will focus on developing the four areas of foreign language apprehension – speaking, reading, writing and listening – by using the textbook along with other sources such as literature, music and periodicals. Vocabulary themes could include – but are not limited to – health, travel and transportation, hotels, the home, and professions. Grammar units covered will concentrate on a review of the future and conditional tenses, an amplification of various perfect tenses as well as the subjunctive mood and its uses, and an introduction to the imperfect subjunctive, including “si” clauses. The class will also be reading several short stories from both Latin American and Spanish authors. The cultural aspect of the course will focus on Jews within the Latin culture. The students’ experiences in Israel will be used as both a conversational and writing focal point. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

AP Spanish Language
An AP Spanish Language course is comparable to an advanced level (5th- and 6th-semester or the equivalent) college Spanish language course. Emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students: understand Spanish spoken by native speakers at a natural pace, with a variety of regional pronunciations, in both informal (interpersonal) and formal (presentational) contexts; develop an active vocabulary sufficient for reading newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary literature, and other non-technical writings (websites, letters and emails, advertisements, signs and instructions) in Spanish without dependence on a dictionary; express themselves by describing, narrating, inquiring, and developing arguments in Spanish, both orally and in writing, with reasonable fluency, using different strategies for different audiences and communicative contexts. In this course, special emphasis is placed on the use of authentic source materials and the integration of language skills.

AP Spanish Literature (five credit hours per week):
An AP Spanish Literature course is comparable to a third-year college introduction to Hispanic literature course. It is based on a required reading list (students must bring a list of the works they have already completed studying). The works on the list are of literary significance and represent various historical periods, literary movements, genres, geographic areas, and population groups within the Spanish-speaking world. The objective of the course is to help you interpret and analyze literature in Spanish.

French II: (five credit hours per week)
The following grammatical topics will be covered: third group verbs; complements, pronouns and their place in the sentence; degrees of comparison; adjectives and adverbs; imperative and “passe compose” of pronominal verbs; past tenses passe compose and imperfect; future of regular and irregular verbs. Writing skills are included in the grammar and vocabulary development units. Vocabulary topics used to develop oral and written skills include: meeting a French family, in the subway, cooking, holidays, at the airport, transportation, holidays, food, at the restaurant, etc. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent , Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

French III: (five credit hours per week)
The following grammar topics will be covered: pronouns (complement, demonstrative, and relative); qui, que, dont, ou, lequel; third group verbs; conditional present and past; indirect speech; subjunctive (present and past). Vocabulary topics used to develop oral and written skills include: knowing other French speaking countries: Africa, Canada, Haiti; vacationing; leisure time; history of literature and French civilization. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent , Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Students may be asked to prepare oral reports in French about their Israel experience. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

French IV: (five credit hours per week)
The fourth year of French further develops the students’ ability to read original selections from many genres of French literature. Attention is also given to increasing fluency in the language. The students complete their study of the major grammatical structures and verb tenses as well as review those previously learned. The course is conducted in French. The teacher will select the literary material to be studied. The French curriculum may also include texts translated into French relating to Jewish and Israeli subjects: Les histoires de Chelm, Haggada de Pessah; Le Plateau D’argent, Nathan Altermannm; Primo Levi texts, Israeli songs (Chava Alberstein), etc. Students may be asked to prepare oral reports in French about their Israel experience. Honors students complete an additional project, paper, or presentation.

AP French Language and Culture
The AP French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable you to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication skills. Students will develop understanding and appreciation of the cultures of the French -speaking world including: Cultural Products such as television and film, books, newspapers, music, laws, and institutions; Cultural Practices such as customs, traditions, and patterns of interactions; Cultural Perspectives such as values, attitudes, and beliefs. Students will also study a variety of topics in engaging themes such as: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics.

Latin 2: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level two, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

Latin 3: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level three, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

Latin 4: (five credit hours per week)
Utilizing the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, level four, students build upon their grammar skills in decoding ancient Latin. Vocabulary building and memorization of grammatical constructs are a significant part of the course, as is a focus on understanding the differences between Latin poetry and prose. Students read excerpts from Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and others.

AP Latin: Vergil: (five credit hours per week)
The course covers the following sections of the Aeneid: Book 1: lines 1-519, Book 2: lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, and 735-804, Book 4: lines 1-448, 642-705, Book 6: lines 1-211, 450-476, and 847-901, Book 10: lines 420-509, Book 12: lines 791-842, 887-952. Students should bring a copy of the Aeneid, as well as an accurate list of the sections they have already studied prior to arrival. Familiarity with the entire content of Books 1 through 12 will also be tested. Students are tested on their abilities in the following areas: To write a literal English translation of a Latin passage on the syllabus, To explicate specific words or phrases in context, To identify the context and significance of short excerpts from texts listed in the chosen syllabus, To identify and analyze characteristic or noteworthy features of the authors’ modes of expression, including their use of imagery, figures of speech, sound effects, and metrical effects (in poetry only), as seen in specific passages, To discuss particular motifs or general themes not only suggested by passages but also relevant to other selections, To analyze and discuss structure and to demonstrate an awareness of the features used in the construction of a poem or an argument, To scan the meters specified in the syllabus.

Other languages: (five credit hours per week)
In recent years, students have taken the following languages as private or semi-private tutorials: Japanese, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, German, American Sign Language, and Russian. Please contact the Ramah Jerusalem High School office for more information. Students will need to bring appropriate curricula and a textbook.

Biology
AP Biology
Chemistry
AP Chemistry
Physics
AP Physics B/C
AP Environmental Science

Biology (five credit hours per week)
This second semester course will cover the following units: Qualities of Life – Themes in Biology, Cell Structure and Function, DNA – Structure and Function, Protein – Structure and Function, Protein Synthesis, Genetics, Evolution, Survey of Phyla, Survey of Animal Kingdoms, Selected Human Systems, Topics in Ethics and Philosophy. Please note: Laboratory experiments will be available on a limited basis only. Students with laboratory requirements are encouraged to complete as much as possible before leaving for Israel.

AP Biology (five credit hours per week):
AP Biology is designed to cover the following themes: Science as a Process, Evolution, Energy Transfer, Continuity and Change, Relationship of Structure to Function, Regulation, Interdependence in Nature, Science, Technology, and Society. In this second half of the course, we expect to cover these themes as related to the topic of Organisms and Populations, with the expectation that students will have already covered Molecules and Cells as well as Heredity and Evolution in the fall.

Chemistry (five credit hours per week):
This second semester course covers the following topics: Acids and Bases, The Mole, Stoichiometry, Heat in Chemical Reactions, Gases, Solutions and Chemical Equilibrium, Bonding and Kinetics, and touches on Nuclear Chemistry. Please note: Laboratory experiments will be available on a limited basis only. Students with laboratory requirements are asked to complete as much as possible before leaving for Israel.

AP Chemistry (five credit hours per week):
In AP Chemistry, students are asked to master concepts related to Structure of Matter, States of Matter, and Reactions, in addition to Descriptive Chemistry, Chemical Calculations, and Laboratory. Lab facilities are limited, so students should complete as much as possible before arriving in Israel. In this second semester course, we aim to begin with Reactions, and assume that students will have covered structure and states of matter in the fall.

Physics (five credit hours per week):
This course includes the basic principles of the physical world and their application and will cover the following topics: wave phenomena; electricity and magnetism; and selected topics in atomic and nuclear physics. Please note: Laboratory experiments will be available on a limited basis only. Students with laboratory requirements are encouraged to complete as much as possible before leaving for Israel.

AP Physics B/C (five credit hours per week):

AP Physics B provides instruction in the following topics: Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Physics, Electricity and Magnetism, Waves and Optics, Atomic and Nuclear Physics. It is our assumption that students will have covered at least half of the material in the first semester. Laboratory facilities are limited, thus students should complete as much as possible before arrival.

Physics C: Mechanics provides instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. This course may be taught as a one or two semester class.

Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism provides instruction in each of the following five content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. This course may be taught as a one or two semester class.

AP Environmental Science (five credit hours per week):
This course addresses the following topics: Earth Systems and Resources, The Living World, Population, Land and Water Use, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution, and Global Change. Students will be expected to have completed approximately half of the topics prior to arrival.

Physical Education (five credit hours per week):
Students participate in strenuous field trips each week and several longer hiking tours throughout the semester. They also participate in an intensive para-military experience and a desert survival week. Students have access to a variety of recreational activities, which include basketball, tennis, soccer, swimming, free weights, and aerobics.

Health (five credit hours per week):
Health is offered as supervised independent study. Students must complete a series of projects/assignments working individually and in small groups (depending on the class size). Projects are overseen by their teacher and guidance is provided. The course covers the topics of health and nutrition, world events, sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and consent

Fine Arts (two-five credit hours)

Music Lessons Private lessons can be arranged. Students should bring their instruments to Israel with them, though rentals of flutes and violins can usually be arranged for an additional fee. Students have access to an electric piano, but should bring headphones.

AP Music Theory, AP Computer Science, AP Art History, and AP Studio Art courses, as well as others, can be arranged.

Dance. Students who are interested in continuing modern dance or ballet lessons may do so at a number of local dance studios. Students should bring dance gear with them. There is an additional fee, paid directly to the studio.

Advanced Placement courses and exams are offered in accordance with the standards of The College Board. All AP exams can be taken at the Ramah Jerusalem High School, and any students who are taking an AP course can be accommodated by our faculty with advance notice.

If enrollment is too small for a full class, AP courses may be offered either as a private or semi-private tutorial at an additional expense. AP classes with full enrollment (min. 3 students) take place 4-5 times per week. Under-enrolled classes take place 3 times per week. Additional study sessions may be scheduled before the AP exams (extra fee may apply).

Although we have a large reference library with review books for most exams, many students prefer to bring a review book from home. In some cases, we will require a specific review book, and in some cases, we will contact you regarding bringing a textbook. AP classes are designed to cover material that will be presented in the AP examinations in May.

In most years, AP US History and AP English Language have full enrollment. Often, AP Chemistry, AP English Literature, AP World History, and AP Biology have full enrollment. Other AP classes may be under-enrolled, and therefore offered as tutorials, though this changes from year to year. We can offer AP Music Theory and AP Computer Science on an as-needed basis.

The Tutorial System / Under-enrolled Courses

Although we offer every course, since we are a small school with a diverse and varying student body, some courses might not be fully enrolled. Students may take any offered course, whether it is fully or under-enrolled. Depending on the needs of the student body, the actual courses, by definition, vary from year to year. While we provide for the academic requirements of our students, there may be additional fees involved.

Overview
All students will be able to enroll in all of the classes they need. These classes have a minimum enrollment of three students. If the classes are all fully enrolled, no additional charges will be assessed. In some cases, students need to take courses that are under-enrolled (one or two students).

Under-enrolled courses (fewer than three students) may have an additional fee. Most under-enrolled courses meet twice weekly (with additional independent study time), though some courses will need to meet at least three times per week. AP Courses and some Regents courses, if under-enrolled, will almost always need to meet three times per week.

It is strongly recommended that most students take no more than five General Studies classes, and, of those classes, that no more than two be at an AP level.

Sometimes students may opt to take an Independent Study in lieu of an under-enrolled or private tutorial class. There is no charge for an Independent Study, but there is also no supervision on the part of the TRY Administration. We will list the Independent Study on the student’s transcript, but without a grade. Classes featured in the course descriptions booklet as ‘supervised independent studies’ will receive a grade.

If a school requires the whole course to be covered in the spring semester, has a two-year cycle for a course, or has significantly different course requirements from those of most schools, the student’s needs are most likely to be met with at least a partial tutorial in addition to the class, or a complete tutorial of two or three weekly sessions. There may be an additional fee.